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HABITAT AND TERRAIN

Between the Grassland in the south and the Boreal Forest in the north lies a subtle mosaic of aspen woodlands, fescue grasslands, shrublands and wetlands on gently rolling landscape referred to as the Parkland Region of Alberta.

This region comprises approximately 12 percent, or 37, 000 square kilometres, of Alberta's territory and is considered to be an area of transition, as it is a region in which the aspen groves are enveloped in a constant conflict with the grasslands for supremacy. The area also has many gently rolling blanket of hills that overlay parts of this region, an effect that was caused by the stagnation and melting of the glaciers during the Ice Age. The vegetation of the aspen parkland with its associated animal life is a rich ecosystem, full of various types of vegetation and species that are not limited to any one particular area. Stands of poplar are interspersed with grasslands and meadows, giving areas a park-like appearance.

This rich agricultural land possesses black soils and receives ample rainfall. Development and farming have drastically altered the vegetation, particularly in the central parkland region. Land use has changed much of the native vegetation; at the same time it has introduced numerous agricultural areas of which the natural food sources of the animals has been enriched further enhancing the quality and health of the animals in the area.

New South Area

The southern region has a total area of approximately 75,500 kmĀ² (29,151 sq mi). Southern Alberta is lined to the west by the Canadian Rockies and their foothills. The rest of region is dominated by the semi-arid prairies, where farms and ranches have been built, often with the help of irrigation. Rivers generally flow from west to east and include the Oldman River, Bow River, Red Deer River and the South Saskatchewan River, which runs right through the middle of the zone we hunt for huge mulies!

The river valleys consist of coulees and valleys and water where the deer go to bed for the day, providing excellent spot and stalk opportunities! Trees and vegetation are are primarily only found in the river valleys were moisture is available. The main food supplies for the deer are crops and hay lands up on the top of the river banks and usually assisted in growth by pivots and irrigation. This allows the perfect opportunity to catch the bucks moving to and from the pivots.

 
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